Should a nation forget its past

Poppies, a symbol of remembrance for lives given in sacrifice for God and nation. It was an occasion for much celebration throughout the British Empire. This was a poem that turned out to be strikingly prophetic for the English speaking people.

Should a nation forget its past

Emergency departments are distilleries boiling complex blends of trauma, stress and emotion down to the essence of immediacy: It addresses the undeniably important issues of who is going to pay and how, but completely misses the point of why.

Healthcare costs too much in our country because we deliver too much healthcare. We deliver too much because we demand too much. And we demand it for all the wrong reasons. I still love my job; very few things are as emotionally rewarding as relieving true pain and suffering, sharing compassionate care and actually saving lives.

Illness and injury will always require the best efforts our medical system can provide. In a single night I had patients come in for the following complaints all brought by ambulance: At a time when we have an unprecedented obsession with health — Dr.

Oz, The Doctors, Oprah and a host of daytime talk shows make the smallest issues seem like apocalyptic pandemics — we have substandard national wellness. This is largely because the media focuses on the exotic and the sensational and ignores the mundane.

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Our society has warped our perception of true risk. We are taught to fear vaccinations, mold, shark attacks, airplanes and breast implants when we really should worry about smoking, drug abuse, obesity, cars and basic hygiene.

If you go by pharmaceutical advertisement budgets, our most critical health needs are to have sex and fall asleep. With every ache and sniffle we run to the doctor, or purchase useless quackery such as Airborne or homeopathic cures to the tune of tens of billions of dollars.

We demand unnecessary diagnostic testing, antibiotics for our viruses, narcotics for bruises and sprains. And due to time constraints on physicians, fear of lawsuits and the pressure to keep patients satisfied, we usually get them.

Should a nation forget its past

Yet the great secret of medicine is that almost everything we see will get better or worse no matter how we treat it. The human body is exquisitely talented at healing.

Should a nation forget its past

We give oxygen and fluids in the right proportions, raise or lower the blood pressure as needed and allow the natural healing mechanisms time to do their work. The bottom line is that most conditions are self-limited. But usually that bronchitis or back ache or poison ivy or stomach flu just needs time to get better.

Every sneeze is swine flu, every headache a tumor. And at great expense, we deliver fantastically prompt, thorough and largely unnecessary care.A nation that forgets its past can function no better than an individual with amnesia. ~David McCullough The good historian is like the giant of the fairy tale.

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He knows that wherever he catches the scent of human flesh, there his quarry lies. ~Marc Bloch, The Historian's Craft. A nation should never forget its past.

If we forgot what happened; we are most likely to repeat the past and the mistakes that started conflict between countries that were involved in wars. These mistakes and actions that a country may have committed in the past are those which have led to their downfall. A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China's Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future (The Princeton-China Series) [Jiang Qing, Daniel A.

Bell, Ruiping Fan, Edmund Ryden] on timberdesignmag.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. As China continues to transform itself, many assume that the nation will eventually move beyond communism and adopt a Western-style democracy. Ad Policy Scrambling for Africa. AFRICOM, the Pentagon’s Africa Command, is building Air Base in Agadez, a town in the nation of Niger.

The $ million installation, which officially opens. Ida B. Wells emerged in the s as the leading voice against the lynching of African Americans following the violent lynching of three of her friends.

"An invaluable book A country finally facing its past could scarcely hope for a better, or more enamored, chronicler of its present."-Sarah Wildman, New York Times Book Review The appearance, more than sixty years after the Spanish Civil War ended, of mass graves containing victims of Francisco Franco's death squads finally broke what Spaniards call "the pact of forgetting"-the unwritten.

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